Time to Milk the Beans

A few years ago I would have laughed at you if you told me I would be making my own plant-based milks at home. Now I’m all about homemade everything. This was my first time making any kind of milk at home. I cannot wait to experiment more with the end result and maybe make a creamer for tea and coffee. I’ll let y’all know how that goes.

This recipe calls for soybeans. I used 1 cup and the end result was two Mason jars full of milk. The end result will vary depending on how much milk you can wrangle out of the beans. Soak the beans overnight in filtered water. Discard the water and boil them for about 30 minutes or until soft but not mushy. Once they are cooked, drain and fill the pot with cold water. Pop your hands in there and start rubbing the beans vigorously between your hands to remove the hulls. They should float up, and you can just scoop them out and throw them in your compost or trash. They are pretty difficult for our bodies to digest and can cause a lot of gas, so get as many of them off and thrown out as possible.

Fill your blender with 3 1/2 cups of filtered water, a pinch of seal salt, and add half of the beans. Blend, blend, blend. Stop every 30 seconds if you don’t have a high-speed blender. If the motor burns out, how will you make the other half of the recipe? Once it looks like an opaque, cream-colored liquid, you can stop.

Here is the actual milking part. You will need a cheesecloth, sieve, and a bowl for this. Place the cheesecloth inside the sieve and make sure there is plenty hanging over the sides. Place this over the bowl and pour the contents of the blender through the cloth. You should end up with about a cup of bean mush and a bunch of liquid. Grab the sides of the cheesecloth, gather them up, and firmly grasp them together in one hand so you’re holding a sack full of soy treasure.

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Take your other hand and start milking the sack. Haha. But seriously, squeeze, massage, milk that sack until no more liquid comes out. The remains in the cheesecloth are actually called okara and are a wonderful base for veggie burgers like my samosa burgers. That’s it. You have now made soy milk. Repeat the process with the other half of beans using 3 1/2 cups of filtered water again. By the way, this cost about $0.40 for the whole batch. This is not my original recipe!


 

Recipe:

  • 1 cup soybeans, soaked overnight
  • 7 cups filtered water
  • salt

Rinse and boil the soaked beans for about 30 minutes or until they are cooked but not too soft.

Once they are cooked, drain and fill the pot with cold water. Pop your hands in there and start rubbing the beans vigorously between your hands to remove the hulls. They should float up, and you can just scoop them out and throw them in your compost or trash.

Add half the water and half the beans to your blender with a pinch of salt. Blend until an opaque liquid forms and the beans are thoroughly incorporated.

Place a cheesecloth inside a sieve and make sure there is plenty of cloth hanging over the sides. Place this over a bowl and pour the contents of the blender through the cloth.

Grab the sides of the cheesecloth, gather them up, and firmly grasp them together in one hand. With your other hand, squeeze the bag until all the liquid has been removed.

Repeat with the remaining beans and water.


 

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